Philippine Peso Coins and Banknotes

Philippine Coins and Banknotes

Pera sa Lumang Papel

I found these very informative documentary videos in YouTube about Philippine Numismatics. It tackles an issue regarding fake overprints, also called private overprints.

PART 1:


PART 2:


These videos were originally shown in Kontrobersyal, a TV show in the Philippines.

Current Legal Tender Philippine Banknotes

Current Philippine legal tender banknotes are referred to as the New Design Series. This series was first issued in 1985. The 500 and 1,000 piso notes were released later in 1987 and 1991 respectively.

For details, click on the images below

1000 Pesos


500 Pesos


200 Pesos


100 Pesos


50 Pesos


20 Pesos


10 Pesos, 2nd version
Out of print but still legal tender


10 Pesos, original version
Out of print but still legal tender


5 Pesos
Out of print but still legal tender

Also in legal tender are various commemorative banknotes such as the 2000 and 100,000 peso bills.

1000 Peso Bill - New Design Series

One Thousand Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Jose Abad Santos, Josefa Llanes Escoda, Vicente Lim, Eternal flame, Laurel Leaves Cenrtral Bank Seal
Reverse: Hagdan-hagdang Palayan ng Banawe, Manunggul jar cover and Langgal hut

Predominant color: Blue
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer notes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext “1000”

Length: 160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, optically variable ink (OVI), and micro-printing

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sanlibong Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

Jose Abad Santos (Chief Justice), Josefa Llanes Escoda (civic worker and one of the founders of the Girl Scouts of the Philippines), and Vicente Lim (a general in the Philippine Army, first Filipino graduate of West Point) are considered heroes of the resistance against the Japanese Occupation of the Philippines.

The Manunggul Jar is a National Treasure of the Philippines. The jar was found in Chamber A of the Manunggul caves in Palawan. The jar is dated from about 2800 years before the present day. The faces of the figures and on the prow of the boat have eyes and mouth rendered in the same style as other artifacts of Southeast Asia of that period. Note the depiction of sea-waves on the lid.

Banaue Rice Terraces (Tagalog: Hagdan-hagdang Palayan ng Banaue) are 2000-year old terraces that were carved into the mountains of Ifugao in the Philippines by ancestors of the Batad indigenous people. The Rice Terraces are commonly referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World". They are found in the provinces of Apayao, Benguet, Mountain Province and Ifugao, and are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Langgal hut is a Muslim place of worship particularly in Sulu, headed by an Imam who is assisted by the Habib and ilal.

500 Peso Bill - New Design Series

Five Hundred Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Benigno S. "Ninoy" Aquino, Jr., Philippine flag, Central Bank seal, dove of peace, Ninoy's typewriter with his initials ("B.S.A.J."), "Faith in our people and faith in God", "The Filipino is worth dying for", Ninoy's signature
Reverse: scenes from Ninoy Aquino's life and some allegorical groups (see note below)

Predominant color: yellow
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer notes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext “500”

Length: 160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, concealed numerical value, and micro-printing

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Limandaang Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

The reverse side features a collage of various images in relation to Aquino. He was (out of some of the pictures) a journalist for the Manila Times, a senator (the pioneer of the Study Now, Pay Later education program), the mayor in his hometown of Concepcion, the governor of Tarlac, and was the main driving force behind the People Power Revolution of 1986, some three years after his death in 1983.

It is also interesting to note that unlike the names of the figures on the bills, "Benigno S. Aquino, Jr." is written in gold-coloured, cursive writing with a green laurel wreath as opposed to the name being simply written as with the other banknotes.

Before this note was printed, 500-piso banknote was to have Ferdinand Marcos and its back was the Batasang Pambansa Complex until People Power Revolution when it was replaced by the current 500-piso banknote. Remnants of this version of the banknote are only for media purposes.

Related post: Cory to Join Ninoy on P500 bill?

200 Peso Bill - New Design Series

Two Hundred Piso Commemorative Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Diosdado P. Macapagal, Aguinaldo Shrine in Kawit, Kavite
Reverse:
scene from EDSA II, with Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo being sworn in as president by Chief Justice Hilario Davide Jr. in January 2001

Predominant color: Green
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic/1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext “200”

Length: 160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, micro-printing, 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic/1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext “200”, and perfect see-through register

Text:
Republika ng Pilipinas, Ang Salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas. Dalawandaang Libong Piso

This banknote is signed by Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and Rafael Buenaventura. The little girl holding a Bible in between Arroyo and Davide at the reverse of the note is Cecilia Paz Razon Abad, daughter of former Philippine Education Secretary Florencio Abad and Batanes Representative Henedina Razon-Abad.

The bill was subject of criticisms by the opposition. They said that the legal tender should only feature deceased national heroes and not an incumbent President. It wasn't the first time that a legal tender featured a sitting President. Legal tender coinage was minted to commemorate the inauguration of Manuel L. Quezon as President of the Philippines in 1935. Emergency currency during World War II had many instances where provincial emergency currency boards placed the image of then President Manuel L. Quezon. In 1975, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas released a 5-Piso coin featuring the face of then President Ferdinand Marcos. Former Presidents Fidel Ramos and Joseph Estrada was also pictured in a limited commemorative 2000-Piso bill that honors the 100-year celebration of Philippine Independence. Also a limited commemorative gold 1000-Piso bill with the picture of former President Joseph Estrada was also issued to honor the 100-year celebration of Philippine Independence.

This note is also a commemorative banknote, released in 2002 to commemorate Philippine independence.

100 Peso Bill - New Design Series

One Hundered Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Manuel A. Roxas, raising of the Philippine flag and lowering of the American flag during the declaration of Independence in July 4, 1946, Central Bank Seal
Reverse: Central Bank Complex along Roxas Boulevard with an inset image of the former Central Bank Building

Predominant color: Violet
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer banknotes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext “100”

Length: 160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, and micro-printing

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sandaang Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

The 100-piso banknote became subject of controversy after banknotes printed in France in time for the Christmas season were printed with the President's name misspelled, the first in Philippine history. The banknotes, of which a small amount are in circulation and are still legal tender, spelled the President's name as "Gloria Macapagal-Arrovo" than the correct Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. More...

50 Peso Bill - New Design Series

Fifty Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Sergio Osmeña, Fuente Osmeña (Osmeña Fountain), gavel, Central Bank Seal
Reverse: National Museum "Pambansang Museo" (formerly Legislative Building)

Predominant color: Red
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded and metallic

Length: 160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton

Security Features:
security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridiscent band, windowed security thread, and microprinting

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Limampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

Sergio Osmeña was the second president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines. He served as president from 1944, after Quezon's death, to 1946, when the United States granted the Philippines' independence.

The National Museum featured on the reverse side of the banknote, used to be the Legislative Building, where the House of Representatives that Osmena presided over as Speaker from 1907-1922 was located. The building was then renamed Executive House during the Martial Law period and was labeled as such in the fifty-piso banknote until recently.

20 Peso Bill - New Design Series

Twenty Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Manuel Quezon, Coat-of-arms of the Commonwealth, Wikang Pambansa, Saligang Batas 1935, Central Bank Seal
Reverse: Malacañan Palace beside the Pasig River "Palasyo ng Malakanyang"

Predominant color:
Orange
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded broken gold colored plastic

Length:
160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing

Text:
"Republika ng Pilipinas", "Dalawampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

Manuel L. Quezon was the first president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines. At the right side of the banknote are the coat-of-arms of the Commonwealth, and two of Quezon's notable accomplishments. The first is Wikang Pambansa, which is Tagalog for "national language". In 1937, the National Language Institute was founded to establish a single national language for the Philippines. This eventually became the Filipino language, which is largely based on Tagalog. The second was the Saligang Batas 1935 or the 1935 Constitution of the Philippines. This was the first real constitution that was nationally effected and large parts of it survive in the current constitution.

The Malacañan Palace at the reverse is, more popularly known as Malacañang Palace, the residence of the President of the Philippines, along the banks of the Pasig River. Quezon was the first Philippine president to live in the Palace.

10 Peso Bill (2nd edition) - New Design Series

Ten Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Apolinario Mabini (left) and Andres Bonifacio (right), KKK flag, Kartilya ng Katipunan, a letter written by Mabini
Reverse: Barasoain Church "Simbahan ng Barasoain" (left), initiation rites of the Katipunan "Mga bagong kasapi ng Katipunan na lumalagda sa mga kasulatan ng KKK sa pamamagitan ng kanilang dugo" (right)

Predominant color:
Brown
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded broken gold colored plastic

Length:
160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

Andres Bonifacio was the founder of the Katipunan, a secret society established to fight the Spanish colonial government. Mabini was the Philippines first Prime Minister and Secretary of Foreign Affairs even though he was a cripple. Because of this, he was often called "The Sublime Paralytic".

The Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan is the site of the first Philippine Congress where the Malolos Constitution was drafted. In the initiation rites of the Katipunan, members accepted into the society had to sign their name on the society's roster using their own blood.

The 10-piso banknote was issued months after the 5-piso banknote was issued. Before 1998, the 10-piso banknote only depicted Mabini and the Barasoain Church. In recent years, the new banknote has been replaced with a 10-piso coin also bearing the effigies of Bonifacio and Mabini.

The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas has stopped printing this banknote. However, existing banknotes remain legal tender.

10 Peso Bill (original version) - New Design Series


Ten Piso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Apolinario Mabini and a letter written by Mabini
Reverse: Barasoain Church "Simbahan ng Barasoain"

Predominant color:
Brown
Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded broken gold colored plastic

Length:
160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns
Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas"

Mabini was the Philippines first Prime Minister and Secretary of Foreign Affairs even though he was a cripple. Because of this, he was often called "The Sublime Paralytic".

The Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan is the site of the first Philippine Congress where the Malolos Constitution was drafted. In the initiation rites of the Katipunan, members accepted into the society had to sign their name on the society's roster using their own blood.

The 10-piso banknote was issued months after the 5-piso banknote was issued. Until 1998, this 10-piso banknote only depicted Mabini and the Barasoain Church. Years later, the bust of Andres Bonifacio was added to the left of Mabini's in a new design. Today, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas no longer prints 10-piso banknotes but existing ones remain legal tender.

5 Peso Bill - New Design Series

Five Peso Banknote
New Design Series

Obverse: Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo, Republika Pilipina marker, Cannon, Bangko Sentral Seal
Reverse: Philippine declaration of independence by Emilio Aguinaldo on June 12, 1898 "Pagpapahayag ng kasarinlan ng Pilipinas noong Hunyo 12, 1898"

Predominant color:
Green

Length:
160mm
Width: 66mm
Thickness: 100-118 microns

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers

Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Limang Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas", "Republika Pilipina 1898-1901; Sa kumbentong ito itinatag ang presidensya ng unang Republika Pilipina na pinanguluhan ng Kgg. Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy at dito'y nanatili mula noong ika-10 ng Setyembre 1898 hanggang ika-29 ng Marso 1899"

The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas has stopped printing this banknote, and it is currently being replaced by equivalent coins. However, existing banknotes remain legal tender.

500 Peso Victory Note

Five Hundred Peso Banknote
Victory Series
images courtesy of mr.philippines of ebay.com

Obverse: Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth
Reverse: "Central Bank of the Philippines VICTORY" overprint, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth

Text
By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature. Approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922. This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the Philippines Five Hundred Pesos payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66, Treasury Certificate

2 Peso Victory Note

Two Peso Banknote from the Victory Series


Obverse: Portrait of Jose Rizal, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth with overprint: "Manila, Philippines"
Reverse: "Philippines", "2 Pesos" with "Victory" overprint

Text: "By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922; This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the; Philippines; Two Pesos; Payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66

1 Peso Victory Note

One Peso Banknote from the Victory Series
credits to Steve

Obverse: portrait of Apolinario Mabini, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth with overprint: "Manila, Philippines"
Reverse: "One Philippine Peso" with VICTORY overprint

Text reads: "By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922; This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the; Philippines; One Peso; Payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66, Treasury Certificate


EDIT: I found a similar banknote but it has a slightly different overprint on the reverse. This one also has "Central Bank of the Philippines".

Thanks to Leogen Tomulto for allowing me to scan his prized banknote. (I almost had to pry it off his hands.)